Good Health Blog

Please review the Blog Terms of Use at the bottom of this page.

Monthly Archives: January 2016

Making bones better

Gavin LeSueur - January 25, 2016

Three factors essential for keeping your bones healthy throughout your life are:

Adequate amounts of calcium
Adequate amounts of vitamin D
Regular exercise

Calcium

Good sources of calcium include:

Low-fat dairy products
Dark green leafy vegetables
Canned salmon or sardines with bones
Soy products, such as tofu
Calcium-fortified cereals and orange juice

If you find it difficult to get enough calcium from your diet, consider taking calcium supplements. But too much calcium has been linked to heart problems and kidney stones.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is necessary for your body to absorb calcium. Many people get adequate amounts of vitamin D from sunlight, but this may not be a good source if you live in high latitudes, if you’re housebound, or if you regularly use sunscreen or you avoid the sun entirely because of the risk of skin cancer.

Scientists don’t yet know the optimal daily dose of vitamin D. A good starting point for adults is 600 to 800 international units (IU) a day, through food or supplements. If your blood levels of vitamin D are low, your doctor may suggest higher doses. Teens and adults can safely take up to 4,000 international units (IU) a day.

Exercise

Exercise can help you build strong bones and slow bone loss. Exercise will benefit your bones no matter when you start, but you’ll gain the most benefits if you start exercising regularly when you’re young and continue to exercise throughout your life.

Combine strength training exercises with weight-bearing exercises. Strength training helps strengthen muscles and bones in your arms and upper spine, and weight-bearing exercises — such as walking, jogging, running, stair climbing, skipping rope, skiing and impact-producing sports — mainly affect the bones in your legs, hips and lower spine.

Swimming, cycling and exercising on machines such as elliptical trainers can provide a good cardiovascular workout, but because such exercises are low impact, they’re not as helpful for improving bone health as weight-bearing exercises are.

Blog Terms of Use

Authority
Our blog is moderated occasionally and posteriorly. Moderators are volunteers. Internet users posting comments on this blog should not be considered as health professionals.

Complementarity
Comments posted on this Blog should be designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her existing physician.

Confidentiality
We remind you that everyone can read and use your comments. You do not have the possibility to erase your own comments.

Comments
Internets users commenting on my blog must behave with respect and honesty at all times. Internet users may not post any commercial/advertising comment. Internet users commenting on my blog must post information which are true and correct to their knowledge. Sources to health/medical claims must be provided when relevant. Moderators Reserve the right to erase, without notification, any comment they would judge inappropriate.